Automatgenererad bild.

From left: Kenneth Abrahamsson, Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research (FAS); Sofia Rickberg, Mistra Arctic Futures; Jonas Edvardsson, E4 Mistra (Energy-efficient reduction of exhausts from vehicles); Lars Frenning, Mistra Innovation; Susanna Bruzell, MistraSWECIA (Mistra’s Swedish research programme on Climate, Impacts and Adaptation); and Lars-Erik Liljelund, Mistra’s CEO, on Mistra’s Programme Directors’ Conference at Högberga Gård in October 2012.

Published

30 June 2013

Managing Mistra programmes

Running a research programme under Mistra’s aegis comprises a wide range of components that are all equally important. Collected here is information about how it is done and what you need to think about on the way.

Agreement

When Mistra’s Board has decided that Mistra should invest in a programme, an agreement between Mistra and the programme host is drawn up. This ‘programme agreement’ common goal. It is important for the programme to have both research and user perspectives. To guarantee this, all Mistra programmes have a special organisation., which applies for as long as the Board has decided to invest, regulates the framework of programme activities.

Organisation

In Mistra programmes, many people work together towards a common goal. It is important for the programme to have both research and user perspectives. To guarantee this, all Mistra programmes have a special organisation.

Plan

The programme board and management direct and monitor activities on the basis of a programme plan that is developed from the application. The plan has to include a budget, planned scientific production and communication activities. It must be updated annually and approved by Mistra.

Finances

Every year, a programme has to submit a budget and financial accounts to Mistra. There are guidelines for drawing up budgets in programme and project applications to Mistra, and also for the financial accounts that are submitted to Mistra annually. These guidelines also provide a framework for the use of the funding in an approved programme.

Communication and user dialogue

Communication is a key aspect of programmes. It serves both to create an internal exchange among participants and to generate a dialogue with users, thereby building bridges between research and society. Its purpose is also to convey the results of the programme, so that they are put to practical use.

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